My book escaped to Cumbria before the official event and launched itself on The Steam Yacht Gondola. This was a happy coincidence and a much needed break. The National Trust wanted poets to read their work to promote their lovely boat ,just when I wanted to promote my book and have a nice trip and the two came together last week at Coniston. It was very fitting that was the first place I read from Three Pounds of Cells — Almost on Brantwood Jetty — which was in response to an exercise writing outdoors at Geraldine Green’s and Pippa Little’s course last October at Brantwood House.

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Noel by Coniston Water

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Gondola Poets

Gondola Poets — Geraldine second left

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Old Man Coniston — that’s what this mountain is called

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Almost on Brantwood Jetty and that’s Ruskin’s house where Geraldine has been poet in residence this year.

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Skipper Jack gave us a lesson in steering her

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WHOOHOO!

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Reading my poem to camera

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Captain Jack’s Blog

That was a launch that was! Thanks Jo Houghton of the National Trust for allowing us all this wonderful opportunity. It’s a day to remember always!

And here’s what Geraldine has to say about

Three Pounds of Cells, by Oonah V. Joslin

Dreams aren’t real are they – or do all our experiences contribute to personal reality – even our nightmares?” asks Oonah V. Joslin in the introduction to her collection Three Pounds of Cells.

The very first poem in this ambitious collection sets the scene for the courageous and delicate, yet probing, enquiries this poet displays in her exploration of the world; her world, yet one that is one of connections.

A sense of playfulness embraces the reader as s/he steps into the poem. It opens up possibilities through the use of white space; a sense of a journey beginning in fragments in ‘Parameters of a Perambulator’ and ending in this beauty of a line – which I feels is a reach into darkness with the optimism of light – in this fine poet’s final poem ‘Same Place as the Music’

I want the light and music to be real.”

And in between? When darkness becomes too real and escape is as necessary as bird to sky, as fish to water, as light to music, as in these lines of innocence, longing and beauty:

under innocent skies and yellow sun


where kindness and imagination meet and dance

to silence, as when Earth was young.”

(Voluntary Exile)

This is a collection to turn and return to when one is in need of solace. Erudite, yet playful, poignant, filled with a yearning to understand what breathes between the interstices, this poet’s light shines through with the music. Once you finish reading you too step into the mystery. These poems will haunt me long after I’ve finished reading them.

Geraldine Green

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